Talks about Burning Man Art and Placemaking

Nonprofits, businesses, government entities, and universities are eager to hear about the opportunities and challenges faced by this evolving cultural experiment. One common way outside organizations demonstrate their interest is to invite members of our staff and community to speak or present at meetings, conferences, festivals, and other events. In 2018, Burning Man Project staff…

Talks about Burning Man Art and Placemaking

Talks about Burning Man Art and Placemaking

Nonprofits, businesses, government entities, and universities are eager to hear about the opportunities and challenges faced by this evolving cultural experiment. One common way outside organizations demonstrate their interest is to invite members of our staff and community to speak or present at meetings, conferences, festivals, and other events. In 2018, Burning Man Project staff were invited to give presentations on topics varying from organizational culture and leadership styles to technology, community management, and urban design.This year, a range of institutions wanted to learn more about our approach to art and creative placemaking — both in the U.S. and abroad.

At the High Desert Museum in Oregon, Burning Man Archivist Christine “LadyBee” Kristen shared her insights into the development of Burning Man art. As Burning Man’s first art curator, LadyBee spent 10 years supporting and connecting the event’s early artists, helping to grow the art and the ambitions of its artists. She told the audience that many artists now premiere their ideas at Burning Man, where the freedom and support to create means they can both play and innovate in ways they can’t do elsewhere.

trevorbice
Posted on:
Post author